Category: Adult Addiction Services

Adult Addiction Services


Suboxone®
The Department’s Adult Addiction Clinic, located at 122 Langley Road North in Glen Burnie, offers Suboxone® (buprenorphine) treatment for Anne Arundel County residents who are opioid addicted. Under the Buprenorphine Initiative and a grant from the State of Maryland Alcohol Abuse and Drug Administration, individuals who are eligible for Suboxone® treatment will be assessed and given treatment.

Patients will be charged according to the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s sliding fee scale. The Department’s case managers will assist patients in obtaining appropriate insurance, and patients with no insurance will receive a voucher for each prescription.

Once stabilized on the buprenorphine, patients will be transferred to local physicians to maintain their treatment within the community. Each patient will receive assistance and monitoring by a case manager for one year.

For more information, call the Adult Addiction Clinic at 410-222-0100.

Service for Providers Prescribing Methadone
The Physician Clinical Support System for Methadone (PCCS-M) connects health care providers who prescribe methadone to treat chronic pain or opioid addiction with experienced clinicians for one-to-one mentoring regarding the use of this medication.

Methadone is an inexpensive opioid medication that has several unique properties that make it particularly well suited to the treatment of chronic pain or opioid addiction. It also has side effects and the potential for overdose requiring specific information for its proper use.

The service is one in a number of federally-funded projects that address the need within the nation’s health care system to provide safe and effective care of patients with chronic pain and opioid addiction while, at the same time, protecting the public from prescription drug abuse and diversion of medications. Using this service, prescribers can contact a mentor, a knowledgeable colleague, by phone or email with specific questions about the use of methadone for treating chronic pain or opioid addiction.

It also provides a website, www.pcss-o.org, from which anyone can download helpful clinical information and materials such as patient information sheets and screening instruments as well as brief, evidence-based reviews on commonly encountered but sometimes difficult clinical questions.

This service has been available since 2003 for physicians who are incorporating buprenorphine treatment for opioid addiction into their practices. Now it has been expanded to prescribers who are using methadone to manage chronic pain or to treat opioid addiction in a federally licensed opioid treatment program.

The PCSS-M has organized a group of practicing physicians with expertise in management of pain as well as treatment of opioid addiction to serve as mentors, on request, by email, phone, or, in some cases, in person. The Physician Clinical Support System for Buprenorphine (PCSS-B) has been providing the same service to physicians providing buprenorphine treatment for patients dependent on prescription opioids or heroin.

Both PCSS-M and PCSS-B are made available to interested physicians and other health care providers at no cost, thanks to support from the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), a part of SAMHSA, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. To receive the services from PCSS, prescribers will call PCSS at 877-630-8812, or register online at www.pcss-o.org.